acm - an acm publication

Innovators

2004

  • Reflections on the Limits of Artificial Intelligence
    Nature is very simple and efficient in everything she makes, and is extremely obvious. We humans like to simulate in an extremely complicated manner what exists quite simply in nature, and what we succeed in simulating falls in the category of artificial intelligence. Artificial intelligence has limits of scope, but they fade away when compared with the performances of natural intelligence. In this study, we undertake to outline some limits of artificial intelligence compared to natural intelligence and some clear-cut differences that exist between the two.
  • Review of Activity-Centered Design
    With new insights to a well-documented topic, this book offers an excellent incentive and useful tools for system designers to pursue activity-centered design.
  • Computing or Humanities?
    The application of computing to research problems in the humanities is not new...
  • Mihai Nadin on Anticipatory Systems
    What is the difference between a falling stone and a falling cat? Mihai Nadin, who directs the newly established Institute for Research in Anticipatory Systems at the University of Texas at Dallas, holds a Ph.D. degree in aesthetics from the University of Bucharest and a post-doctoral degree in philosophy, logic and theory of science from Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich, West Germany. He earned an M.S. degree in electronics and computer science from the Polytechnic Institute of Bucharest and an M.A. degree in philosophy from the University of Bucharest. He has authored 23 books, including "The Civilization of Illiteracy," "Mind: Anticipation and Chaos," and "Anticipation: The End is Where We Start From."
  • Michael Schrage on Innovation
    Looking for the great clients who are the true innovators? Co-director of the MIT Media Lab's eMarkets Initiative, a senior advisor to MIT's Security Studies Program, and a consultant to MIT's Langer Labs on technology transfer issues, Michael Schrage conducts research on the economics of innovation. His particular focus is on the role of models, prototypes and simulations in managing interactive iterative design, an area in which he works with a number of companies.
  • Technology footnotes: international time line
    In the days of hot type, magazine content was set in film. This writer offered "intriguing" suggestions for making publications more appealing to international audiences.
  • Checking in with Ben Bederson
    By focusing on the user experience, the University of Maryland's Human-Computer Interaction Lab aims to improve lives through projects such as the International Children's Digital Library. Benjamin B. Bederson, interviewed here, is an Associate Professor of Computer Science and director of the Human-Computer Interaction Lab at the Institute for Advanced Computer Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park. His work is on information visualization, interaction strategies, and digital libraries.
  • Patterns for Success
    Scott D. Anthony speaks about using innovation theory to transform organizations and create the next wave of growth. Anthony is a partner at Innosight, a management, consulting and education company located in Watertown, Massachusetts, and is co-author with Clayton M. Christensen and Erik A. Roth of the new book, "Seeing What's Next: Using the Theories of Innovation to Predict Industry Change."
  • Interfaces for staying in the flow
    Psychologists have studied "optimal human experience" for many years, often called "being in the flow". Through years of study, the basic characteristics of flow have been identified. This paper reviews the literature, and interprets the characteristics of flow within the context of interface design with the goal of understanding what kinds of interfaces are most conducive to supporting users being in the flow. Several examples to demonstrate the connection to flow are given.
  • An Interview with Joichi Ito: The world wide blog
    Joichi Ito, founder of Neoteny and other Internet companies, finds that cyberspace is embracing it roots — collaboration, community, and personal communications — with bloggers leading the way.
  • S. Joy mountford on interface design
    The ultimate technology world will be soft, flexible and addressable. But the issues will remain the same, according to interface designer S. Joy Mountford: What do people like and what do people want?
  • Protecting intellectual property rights through information policy
    In today's electronic world, an organization's intellectual property is sometimes its biggest asset. Much time and money can be saved, and frustration and litigation avoided if company policy dictates ownership and use of intellectual property.
  • Ann Kirschner on marketing and distribution of online learning
    Outside of business schools, the very word "marketing" makes most universities uncomfortable, as does the idea of students as customers. But the world of higher education is becoming increasingly competitive. Fathom, named for the double idea of comprehension and depth, was a milestone in the evolution of online learning and a prototype of where things are headed.
  • An Interview with Steven Weber: Why open source works
    Author Steven Weber looks beyond the hype on Open Source. More than a self-governing utopia, it's a practical, sustainable way of organizing and innovating. Its method may soon be applied successfully in other sectors. Plus, a "crazy" idea for Microsoft.
  • An Interview with Jesse Poore: Correct by design
    Jesse Poore suggests a revolution in programming - holding software developers to the same level of rigor of training and workmanship as other professionals, developing software that's correct by design, and constraining the release of software-intensive products until they are scientifically certified as fit for use.
  • Roger Brent and the alpha project
    The work of a multidisciplinary genomic research lab in Berkeley may yield big changes in drug therapy and medicine. Roger Brent is President and Research Director of the Molecular Sciences Institute, an independent nonprofit research laboratory in Berkeley, CA, that combines genomic experimentation with computer modeling. The mission of the MSI is to predict the behavior of cells and organisms in response to defined genetic and environmental changes.
  • Calm technologies in a multimedia world
    In an ideal world, computers will blend into the landscape, will inform but not overburden you with information, and make you aware of them only when you need them.
  • Technology benefiting humanity
    Memo to the new generation of tech philanthropists: Apply the same intellect and discipline to your philanthropy as you employ in business.
  • Esther Dyson ... In focus
    Venture capitalist Esther Dyson is the chairman of EDventure Holdings, which publishes the influential monthly computer-industry newsletter Release 1.0 as well as the blog Release 4.0. The company also organizes the high-profile technology conference PC (Platforms for Communications) Forum, March 21-23, 2004. In this interview, she discusses her current interests, many to be covered at PC Forum. They include her investments, how to stop spam, outsourcing, and the overall high-tech industry environment.
  • An Interview with Peter Denning: The great principles of computing
    Peter Denning teaches students at the Naval Postgraduate School how to develop strategic, big-picture thinking about the field of computing. Denning, a past president of ACM (1980-82), has been involved with communicating our discipline, computing, to outsiders since 1970. Along the way he invented the working set model for memory management, developed the theory of virtual memory, promulgated operating systems theory, co-invented operational analysis of system performance, co-founded CSNET, and led the ACM Publications Board while it developed the Digital Library. He is an ACM Fellow and holds five major ACM awards. He just completed a five-year term as chair of the ACM Education Board.
  • An Interview with Thomas Kalil: Where politics, policy, technology and science converge
    From the White House to Berkeley, Thomas Kalil has worked on shaping the national agenda for science and technology research initiatives. Kalil, President Clinton's former science and technology advisor, now holds a similar post at the University of California, Berkeley, where he helps develop new research initiatives and increase UC Berkeley's role in shaping the national agenda.
  • Emotional design
    Beauty and brains, pleasure and usability go hand-in-hand in good design.
  • 2004, The turning point
    An overview of some of the issues that will change the way we use the Internet